How to install VMware tools on wheezy

The VMware Tools package adds drivers and utilities to improve the graphical performance for different guest operating systems, including mouse tracking. The package also enables some integration between the guest and host systems, including shared folders, plug-and-play devices, clock synchronisation, and cutting-and-pasting across environments.

Note. When installing VMware tools on wheezy running older versions of VMware ESX/ESXi you may have some issues because of missing modules. This may be fixed with patches but another option would be to use open-vm-tools as an alternative. Here’s a tutorial on how to install open-vm-tools: How to install Open Virtual Machine Tools (open-vm-tools) on squeeze/wheezy

1. Install kernel headers and tools required to compile and install VMware tools:

apt-get install binutils cpp gcc make psmisc linux-headers-$(uname -r)
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How to install Open Virtual Machine Tools (open-vm-tools) on squeeze/wheezy

The Open Virtual Machine Tools (open-vm-tools) are the open source implementation of VMware Tools. They are a set of guest operating system virtualization components that enhance performance and user experience of virtual machines.

wheezy

Installing open-vm-tools is very easy on wheezy, just install the package using apt-get and reboot the machine when completed.

apt-get install open-vm-tools
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Installing VMware tools on squeeze

The VMware Tools package adds drivers and utilities to improve the graphical performance for different guest operating systems, including mouse tracking. The package also enables some integration between the guest and host systems, including shared folders, plug-and-play devices, clock synchronisation, and cutting-and-pasting across environments.

This tutorial has been tested on Debian squeeze running on VMware ESXi 4.x but should work on all latest VMware hosts.

1. Install kernel headers and tools required to compile and install VMware tools:

apt-get install binutils cpp gcc make psmisc linux-headers-$(uname -r)
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Installing VMware server 2.x on Debian lenny

VMware Server can create, edit, and play virtual machines. It uses a client-server model, allowing remote access to virtual machines, at the cost of some graphical performance (and 3D support). In addition to the ability to run virtual machines created by other VMware products, it can also run virtual machines created by Microsoft Virtual PC.

1. Install required packages

apt-get install psmisc make gcc gcc-4.1 linux-headers-$(uname -r)
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Installing VMware tools on lenny

This has been tested on Debian lenny running on VMware server 2.0.

Install kernel headers and some tools used to install VMware tools:
apt-get install binutils cpp gcc make psmisc linux-headers-$(uname -r)

Mount the cdrom drive. Make sure you have mounted the VMware tools virtual cd from the host before moving on.
mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/
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Installing VMware server on Debian etch

VMware Server installs on any existing server hardware and partitions a physical server into multiple virtual machines by abstracting processor, memory, storage and networking resources, giving you greater hardware utilization and flexibility. Streamline software development and testing and simplify server provisioning as you utilize the ability to “build once, deploy many times.”

In this tutorial we’ll install the free VMware server 1.x and VMware Management Interface to a Debian etch system.

First install required packages

apt-get install kernel-headers-`uname -r` psmisc libx11-6 libx11-dev xspecs libxtst6 libXt-dev libXrender-dev libxi6 lvm-common lvm2 xfsprogs

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Install VMware tools

This has been tested on Debian etch running on VMware ESX and VMware server 2.0 hosts.

Install kernel headers and some tools used to install VMware tools
apt-get install binutils cpp gcc make psmisc linux-headers-$(uname -r)

Mount the cdrom drive. Make sure you have mounted the VMware tools virtual cd from the host before moving on.
mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/
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